Show which rule a PASSED SPAMMY message hit

regarding mail logs, I’d love to see which rule a PASSED SPAMMY message hit…

in my daily job, searching/grepping the logs file is a ordinary task.

and another thing I miss is the possibility to have a full mail transaction (either incoming or outgoing) about a specific mail address…

finally, out there (internet) there are many script to parse dovecot/postfix logs…

I already asked this question (about rules in spammy msg) and the answer was "you’ll find them into the message headers"
sometimes I don’t have the message and it could be deleted…

Perhaps it can come out by increasing amavisd log verbosity…

I find useful the postfix queue ID (like 10FBD8C0226); it is a backward search in /var/log/maillog from the delivery action to the original SMTP client.

use Amavis to send report to Admin in which it Shows by what rule and by what Bed Header mail PASSED to User!

$mailfrom_notify_admin = “root@$mydomain”;
$mailfrom_notify_spamadmin = “root@$mydomain”;

$final_spam_destiny = D_PASS;
$final_bad_header_destiny = D_PASS;

no, I don’t want any kind of report sent via mail…
I need to see, in maillog file, which rules a SPAMMY message (passed or not) had hit…

just for comparison, in SME server I read:

2015-06-22 16:43:51.860269500 12952 spamassassin plugin (data_post): check_spam: No, hits=4.2, required=5.0, tests=HTML_MESSAGE,MIME_HTML_ONLY,TVD_FW_GRAPHIC_NAME_LONG,URIBL_BLOCKED,URI_NO_WWW_BIZ_CGI

so it’s easy for me to grep, for example for “URIBL_BLOCKED”

another thing maybe I miss (I’m not alreary confortable with postfix’s logs) is the way to identify denied messages like this one:

2015-06-22 15:40:16.008486500 11174 logging::logterse plugin (deny): ` 196.207.30.180 nairobi.pollmans.co.ke ypfgcgzqwq hotel@host24-56-static.38-79-b.business.telecomitalia.it dnsbl 903 Blocked - see http://www.spamcop.net/bl.shtml?196.207.30.180 msg denied before queued

TIA

@filippo_carletti has made some test on amavis log verbosity, I don’t know if there an open issue or it’s in testing